Category Archives: Prevention

County Health Officer’s March 23 Statement: COVID-19

See the San Mateo County Health Officer, Dr. Scott Morrow’s most recent statement on COVID-19 posted on March 23, which provides a better understanding of where we find ourselves today, and the critical need for everyone to shelter in place.

You can also read his previous statements from 3/16/20, 3/10/20, 3/5/20, and 2/27/20 here: https://www.smchealth.org/post/health-officer-statements.

Get the latest San Mateo County Health COVID-19 news and information at www.smchealth.org/coronavirus.

Protecting Yourself from COVID-19

Information and Updates on Coronavirus (COVID-19)

San Mateo County Health is working closely with the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to respond to novel coronavirus and its potential impacts on the Bay Area. Visit https://www.smchealth.org/coronavirus for information and updates.

Call 2-1-1 for Non-Medical, Non-Emergency Questions About Coronavirus.

2-1-1 is a confidential service accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week in 180 languages. Callers can get answers to questions about how residents, schools and businesses should prepare for COVID-19, as well as ways to prevent the spread of the virus.

Need Support During the Holidays? Call/IM the Peer Run Warm Line

The California Peer-Run Warm Line is a non-emergency resource for anyone in the Bay Area seeking emotional support, providing assistance via phone and web chat on a nondiscriminatory basis to anyone in need.

Some concerns callers share are challenges with interpersonal relationships, anxiety, panic, depression, finance, and alcohol and drug use.

The California Peer-Run Warm Line is open for service this Thanksgiving weekend and throughout December, including Holidays!

Current hours: 7am-11pm, 7 Days a Week.
Call 1-855-845-7415.
For more info and to access online chat: California Peer-Run Warm Line

Watch for announcements as hours will be expanding to 24/7 sometime soon in 2020!



Camp Glenwood Boys Share Their Stories

In November 2018, the boys in Section 4 at Camp Glenwood shared their stories about their hopes for Camp Glenwood and YSC. The Photovoice cohort wanted to highlight the services and resources that benefit them at Camp. They wanted to share their stories with decision makers and providers in San Mateo County in hopes of maintaining and expanding the services they feel that benefit them. This way, other young men who are labeled as “at-risk” in San Mateo County can receive the same resources and services that the boys in Section 4 feel benefit them. Unfortunately, these stories were especially prescient due to the recent news that Camp Glenwood will be closing and moved to Youth Services Center.

Their stories mention the benefits of ‘home passes’, the benefits of the weight room at Camp, and more.

Read more

[Cannabis] Decoded Educates San Mateo County Youth

In partnershship with the San Mateo County Youth Commission, BHRS’ new education initiative aims to teach youth about the health effects of cannabis use. Check out www.cannabisdecoded.org (Parents, we have resources for you too!) and the accompanying Instagram account, @cannabis_decoded today.

Police Victimization: A Link to Suicide

Among many different factors, one’s environment can play a major role in increasing risk for suicide. Almost 57% of suicide risk can be attributed traumatic events occurring in one’s physical and social environments. Stressful life events experienced at the neighborhood and community levels can create feelings of hopelessness, fear, sorrow, and despair. If left untreated, such feelings can translate to suicidal thoughts and/or attempts. One major environmental exposure of concern is police victimization, whose impacts stem beyond its immediate effects on death and physical harm. 

A study published just last year, found a 12-month prevalence of suicide attempts among individuals with lifetime exposure to police victimization. Police victimization was defined as: physical violence, physical violence with a weapon, sexual assault, psychological victimization, and neglect. Racial/ethnic minorities, sexual minorities, males, and low income populations disproportionately experienced and/or witnessed police victimization. Suicide attempts were highest among individuals specifically exposed to assaultive forms of police victimization such as physical violence, physical violence with a weapon, and sexual assault. In brief, it was established that assaultive police victimization is strongly associated with suicide attempts.

Given its serious collateral effects on mental health, there is an urgent need to prevent suicide among marginalized communities heavily exposed to police victimization. Comprehensive, trauma-informed trainings for police officers are one of many upstream approaches to help prevent exposure to police victimization. Trainings should specifically include information on Race-Based Trauma, given that police victimization is most commonly reported by African American and Latino populations. Additionally, people reporting exposure to police victimization should be screened for suicide ideation and/or attempts with tools that specifically assess for physical and sexual violence during police-community encounters. Screenings should then of course be followed by appropriate ongoing treatment and support. Applying both a preventive and treatment lens to this issue is critical, as it will ensure that we are fully supporting the lives, health, and wellbeing of individuals and entire communities impacted by police victimization.

San Mateo County’s Suicide Prevention Committee is currently focusing on two workgroups: QPR training and outreach. To learn more about the Suicide Prevention Committee, and how to become a member of the committee, visit here

Written by Angelica Delgado, Office of Diversity and Equity

 

BE SAFE. BE RESPONSIBLE. Know the health effects of cannabis use

Let's Talk Cannabis blueThe New Year brought with it the legalization of cannabis in California. While medical marijuana has been legal in the state for over two decades, California voters took to the ballots last November to approve of Proposition 64, legalizing recreational cannabis.

Adults 21 or older can now use, carry and grow cannabis. In a 2016 survey of San Mateo County residents, 20 percent of respondents reported currently using cannabis. One in ten non-users said they would try it if it were legalized.

Now that adult use is legal in San Mateo County, you probably have lots of questions about the health effects of cannabis use. Check out this Wellness Matters article for answers.

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