Parent Project Fall 2019 All Class Flyer

The Parent Project® is a free, 12-week course that is offered in English and Spanish to anyone who cares for a child or adolescent. The classes meet for three hours each week. Parents learn parenting skills and get information about resources and other support available in their communities. Parents/caregivers learn and practice skills such as:

  • appropriate ways to discipline
  • preventing or stopping alcohol, drug and tobacco use
  • improving communication skills
  • improving grades and school attendance

Each class also provides free dinner and childcare to make it as accessible as possible to all parents/guardians.

Please help share Parent Project’s Fall 2019 All Class Flyer with your networks!

Keep Getting the Help You Need

In a new media outreach campaign, county officials aim to make it clear that no changes have been made at this time to “public charge” definitions as it relates to immigrants and immigration status. In fact, county officials strongly encourage all clients and patients to continue getting the help they need by accessing healthcare, food and housing services whenever necessary.

Last year, the federal government put forth a proposal that could significantly affect how immigration officials determine whether or not an immigrant is primarily dependent on government assistance.

Several lead organizations in San Mateo County including the Health and Human Services Agency, Health Plan of San Mateo, the Department of Housing, the Office of Community Affairs and the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County have joined together to ease concerns around “public charge.”

Free legal aid and interpretation services are being offered to help answer any questions about green card applications and immigration-related or public charge issues. Providers are encouraged to connect their clients with this resource.

Download the poster below for more information or print and post in your offices.

Deadline Approaching to Submit David Lewis Awards Nominations

The San Mateo County Mental Health & Substance Abuse Recovery Commission is seeking nominees for its annual David Lewis Award – Recognizing Outstanding Contributions towards recovery. This honor is made to the individual or organization that has made an extraordinary difference in the lives of people with substance abuse disorders and the San Mateo County community. Recognition is given for public education or advocacy around alcohol and other drug abuse issues or to address stigma; services to persons with substance abuse disorders; creation of new and innovative programs or community support activities; recognition of fundraising for substance abuse treatment activities or long-term financial support to substance abuse programs; working for new legislation; compassionate treatment of persons with alcohol and other drug disorders.

Confidentiality of private information is very important. If you are nominating someone who is in recovery, please be sure that they are comfortable revealing their status.

Awards will be presented to honorees at the San Mateo County Mental Health & Substance Abuse Recovery Commission meeting on September 4, 2019.

The deadline to submit nominations is August 2, 2019.

Download instructions and nomination form below.

2019 Tony Hoffman Awards

The Tony Hoffman Award, presented by the San Mateo County Mental Health and Substance Abuse Recovery Commission recognizes individuals, professionals, businesses, or media representatives who have made an extraordinary difference in the lives of people with mental illness and the San Mateo County community. Recognition is given for public education or advocacy to promote mental health awareness and needs or to address stigma; services to persons with mental illness; creation of new and innovative programs or community support activities; recognition of fundraising for mental health activities or long-term financial support to mental health programs; working for new mental health legislation; compassionate treatment of persons with mental illness. 

We salute this year’s recipients:

  • Detective Mike Tabak (law enforcement) is with the San Mateo Sheriff’s Department and he leads the Psychiatric Emergency Response Team (PERT). He was recognized for the ways in which he tirelessly connects patients and families with services and resources to prevent hospitalization and incarceration.
Det. Mike Tabak, 2019
Tony Awards Recipient

“When a call involves a suspected mental health crisis, a deputy officer is often the first person to arrive on the scene. Detective Tabak works with all law enforcement in the county to administer 40 hours of Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training every three months – three times the state average. He continuously strives for greater collaboration around mental health issues.” -David Pollack, Nominating Officer

Jeffrey John Earl Edgerton (r), 2019 Tony Award Recipient
  • Jeffrey John Earl Edgerton (client/servce provider/volunteer) is an AOD counselor at Voices of Recovery and a wrap facilitator who empowers individuals with peer support. 

Edgerton says his work is in the community of mental health and substance use disorder. In accepting his nomination he lamented on how comorbidity has plagued himself and his peers for years, yet he has been able to reach full recovery despite life challenges through a Wellness Recovery Action Plan and the 12 Steps of Narcotics Anonymous

  • Jonay Grant (service provider/not pictured) works as a BHRS Transitional Age Youth counselor, peer counseling course instructor and she is an anti-stigma mental health role model.

“She is dedicated to helping people in the community. She also is creative and inspiring to her students. She motivates and encourages peers to be the person they can be”. -Yoko Ng, Nominating Officer

**Awards were presented to honorees at the San Mateo County Mental Health & Substance Abuse Commission meeting on May 1, 2019.

Share Your Story during Recovery Month

Across the country, people in recovery are celebrating their successes and sharing them with others in an effort to educate the public about treatment, reduce stigma and inspire others that recovery is possible.

Every September, Behavioral Health and Recovery Services (BHRS) recognizes Recovery Month by sharing personal stories of hope, resilience and recovery from individuals in San Mateo County who are living with and/or recovering from a substance use and/or mental health condition.  We seek brief narratives from individuals reflecting diverse perspectives who are interested in sharing their story publicly.  Stories from family members’ perspectives are also welcome. 

Narratives may be shared in Wellness Matters (BHRS’ online newsletter), on the BHRS blog, or other San Mateo County Health communications and social media channels, such as facebook.  See an example of past stories published.

Stories are due August 2, 2019. Please refer to the guidelines to learn more about submitting your story.

East Palo Alto Wellness Center Introduces New Programs and Partnerships

Services at the Barbara A. Mouton Multicultural Wellness Center have significantly expanded with more workshops, events, support groups and mental health resource services being added over the past year.

The facility’s multicultural environment is designed to affirm the inherent worth and dignity of individuals served in a community that reflects and celebrates the diversity of East Palo Alto.

The Mouton Center was established in 2009 by One East Palo Alto.  It is funded by BHRS with Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) funding. 

Click here to read more.

Innovative Pride Center to Remain Open

The one stop shop support and services center is the first of its kind in San Mateo County and thanks to an Innovation funding extension, it will continue serving the local LGBTQ+ community.

Services offered by the Center include:

  • Psycho-educational and social/community activities
  • Mental health clinical services
  • Resources for local, county and national LGBTQ+ services.

California’s Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission (MHSOAC) approved the extension to keep the center operating in March.

The Pride center has provided services, training and events for over 3,000 participants since opening in 2017. Read the full article here.

To see more stories, read past and current issues, or subscribe to our Wellness Matters newsletter, click here.

Mental Health Care Clients Can Live Longer With Holistic Approach

BHRS is seeing improved physical and psychological health outcomes in the Total Wellness program. The holistic health care approach, established in collaboration with the San Mateo Medical Center, combines mental and physical health services in one location to better serve mentally ill adult clients who also have physical health conditions.  

Consistent and solid improvement is occurring among consumers managing conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. The program was created a few years ago because, on average, people with behavioral health issues tend to die 25 years earlier than their peers because of poor access.

To learn more about the Total Wellness program, read the full article in the BHRS “Wellness Matters” newsletter.

You can also subscribe to Wellness Matters here.

Free training offered to help prevent suicide in the restaurant industry

In honor of Anthony Bourdain’s life and for his birthday today, the Giving Kitchen is supporting suicide prevention efforts in the restaurant industry by offering free QPR training to anyone in the restaurant industry.   Tell your favorite waitresses, waiters, baristas, chefs, or restaurant owners to go to www.givingkitchen.com to sign up for the free training.   Read the story on CNN.

Immigrant Mother Uses BHRS Program to Change Her Life and Help Community

Maria Cuellar, BHRS Health Ambassador

When Maria Cuellar became a BHRS Health Ambassador in 2016, she made a commitment to reconcile her past – and she did.  She tells what it was like to reunite with her two daughters 26 years after making the painful decision to leave them behind in her native country, El Salvador.

 “I hugged them with all my heart and we spent hours talking. One of my daughters has a bachelor’s degree in language and the other became a doctor this year,” she said.

Cuellar says all the BHRS Health Ambassador Program (HAP) trainings she participated in helped her become a better parent while raising her other two children here in the U.S.  

She is one of nearly 30 people who have graduated since the program’s inception in 2014.

Health Ambassadors help link individuals to care by spreading awareness about BHRS resources and services and in turn helps BHRS better understand the community’s needs.   

To read more BHRS “Wellness Matters” newsletter articles, click here.

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