Category Archives: Community Education

Adults 55+ Join us for “Appy Hour”

Attend a free training

Do you use technology?

“Appy Hours” are basic 101 training’s on using smart phones and tablets for downloading apps, navigating phones/tablets, going to the app stores, and downloading an app.

Bring your smart phone, tablet, or laptop or come without devices.

Click the links below for more info on each session.

San Mateo location

Monday, October 21, 12pm-1pm
Monday, November 18, 12pm-1pm

San Mateo County Pride Center
1021 S. El Camino Real, San Mateo
(Lunch provided)

East Palo Alto location

(flyer in English and Spanish)
Monday, October 21, 3pm-4pm
The Barbara A. Mouton Multicultural Wellness Center (upstairs)
903 Weeks St., East Palo Alto
(Light refreshments served)

RSVP before Oct. 18 and Nov. 15
Sign up with Arlene Aquino
(650) 403-4200 Ext. 4327
aaquino@peninsulafamilyservice.org


Having difficulty hearing or seeing your smartphone?

Attend a free training

Make your Android or iPhone work better for you!
Learn how to:

  • Make your smartphone louder and easier to hear
  • Send text messages
  • Connect Bluetooth devices
  • Operate the basic functions on your smartphone and much more!

Click the links below for more info on each session. 
iPhone users: Friday, October 25th, 10am-12pm
Android users: Wednesday, October 30, 10am-12pm

Where: 24 Second Ave., San Mateo-Peninsula Family Service

Seating is limited — sign up with Arlene Aquino
Call: (650) 403-4200 Ext. 4327, Email: aaquino@peninsulafamilyservice.org

Potential Changes to Public Charge – SMC Health Advises Community to Keep Accessing Benefits

SMC Health is deeply concerned about how the proposed changes to federal immigration rules called “public charge,” will impact public health. The proposed changes significantly expand what public benefits are considered as public charge (e.g., Medi-Cal, CalFresh, public housing or Section 8 vouchers). The County is engaged in advocacy around these issues through the Board of Supervisors.

When residents fear obtaining public benefits to access basic healthcare, food, or housing, people’s health conditions can suffer and actions that prevent the spread of disease (such as getting vaccinated) may not occur.

San Mateo County Health encourages residents to continue accessing the public benefits and services they need and remain available to them. Any rule changes would not go into effect until after public comments are reviewed.

Read more about what the potential changes to public charge could mean for you.

The S- Word Film Screening and Panel Opens Up Dialogue About Suicide and Stigma

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Last Wednesday, on September 19th, over 100 people attended San Mateo County’s first ever S- Word Film Screening and Panel hosted at the San Mateo High School Performing Arts Center in collaboration with San Mateo Union High School District, Star-Vista and the Office of Diversity and Equity. 

The S- Word is a documentary following a survivor of a suicide attempt as she embarks on a mission to document the stories of fellow survivors and document their stories of insight, humor, and courage. She discovers a national community rising to transform personal struggles into action.

During the panel discussion, audience members were able to ask questions about suicide anonymously that were displayed on the projector for the panelists to answer. Questions included “how do I connect with others that are considering suicide” and “what’s the best time or age to talk about this topic?” 

Sylvia Tang, Office of Diversity and Equity, Co- Chair of Suicide Prevention Committee, and Co- Coordinator of this event states,  

“I am so thankful that we had an engaged audience who asked thoughtful questions and wanted more community screenings of the S-Word. This film helped start a dialogue about suicide; this is such an important first step in suicide prevention because it raises awareness and reduces stigma around suicide.  We hope more community members and agencies join the San Mateo County Suicide Prevention Committee because we need everyone to help prevent suicide in our schools and greater community.”  

Special thanks to all the panelists: 

And all who tabled including:

This event was co-partnered by StarVista, The Office of Diversity and Equity, and San Mateo Union High School District.

August 24 – 2nd Annual Mental Health Open Mic at Philz

flyerOpenMic.jpg

On Friday, August 24th, please join us for the 2nd Annual Mental Health Open Mic at Philz in Westborough Square. 

First 50 to register via eventbrite will receive a free coffee that evening! 

We hope to see you there, and we especially hope to hear you speak at our open mic!

Know the signs, find the words, and reach out. Break the silence. 

 

Facebook event link can be found here. 

This event is hosted by Supervisor Canepa, District 5, The Office of Diversity and Equity, Pacific Islander Initiative, Filipino Mental Health Initiative, and Chinese Health Initiative

From Neighborhood to Classroom: Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (CPTSD)

 

Trauma Informed Care

Trauma Informed Care

For many years, conversations around posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have primarily focused on military veteran populations returning from war. Keeping in mind that exposure to life-threatening, traumatic experiences are not just limited to military veterans, efforts are being made to shed light on other groups that are also impacted by PTSD. One of those groups includes students of color in historically marginalized communities.

1 in 3 students of color living in historically marginalized communities display symptoms of mild to severe PTSD.

In other words, youth of color are twice as likely to experience mild to severe symptoms of PTSD compared to soldiers returning from live combat.

Poverty, institutional racism, homicide, and neighborhood disinvestment represent some of many exposures linked to PTSD among students of color. However, the conversation doesn’t end there.

PTSD assumes a person will experience physical, mental, and emotional distress after being exposed to a traumatic life experience. For students of color, that exposure is continuous. Living in a historically marginalized community means that students will return to and experience traumatic events/conditions such as poverty, institutional racism, homicide, and neighborhood disinvestment, on a daily basis. PTSD on its own does not capture the complexity of those experiences. Thus, students of color living in communities with high exposures to such conditions may actually be experiencing Complex Posttraumatic Disorder, or CPTSD.

Read more

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